Drama Porn: A White Woman Adventures In The North

In a recent New York Times Article on Inuit Peoples, Art and Economics, a New York Times journalist “doesn’t use the words #colonialism or #trauma”.

Native American Journalists Association (NAJA) have pushed back on an article “about #Inuit in Cape Dorset, Nunavut, published in the New York Times, entitled “Drawn from Poverty: Art Was Supposed to Save Canada’s Inuit. It Hasn’t.” In an article by Canada’s National Observer we see the importance of a shared understanding of what words, terms, and phrases mean to First Peoples and Settlers. The author of the New York Times article, a Settler, demonstrates her lack of historical understanding of the #Genocide that took place and continues to be in full effect due to racist policies as being fundamental to the #CONTEXT of what she saw and experienced in the North. Don’t even get me started on the wild notion that #ART was to have saved the Inuit. Art is a European concept and practice. For First Peoples, creating sacred objects and symbols, dance and song are part of their traditional culture and deeply embedded in their holistic worldview. Their cultural expressions were not a separate act of image making designed to communicate this or that idea. Since the 17th Century the definition of what art is has been highly contested . The role of the European artist as “the antenna of the race”, as one who “updates consciousness”, is hardly a practice that makes money or provides any form of economic stability in a colonial capitalist culture that abhors critiques of its despicable past…

“Some other important terms are missing, Compton says: genocide, Truth and Reconciliation Commission, or missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls inquiry.”

“Indigenous people and #journalists regularly call out mainstream media for inappropriate wordplaycriminalizing victims and undermining violence against Indigenous people.”